• Pedro Pietri - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1991

    Pedro Pietri - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1991

  • Brenda Coultas - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1996

    Brenda Coultas - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1996

  • Miguel Algarín - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

    Miguel Algarín - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

  • Taylor Mead - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

    Taylor Mead - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

  • Amiri Baraka

    Amiri Baraka

  • Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1986

    Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1986

  • Ann Lauterbach, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Ann Lauterbach, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Yoshiko Chuma - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1995

    Yoshiko Chuma - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1995

  • John Ashbery & Kenneth Koch - Photo credit: Laure Leber

    John Ashbery & Kenneth Koch - Photo credit: Laure Leber

  • John Giorno - Photo credit: Sarah Wells, 1981

    John Giorno - Photo credit: Sarah Wells, 1981

  • Charles Bernstein, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Charles Bernstein, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Tracie Morris & Vernon Reid - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

    Tracie Morris & Vernon Reid - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

  • Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman & Robert Creeley

    Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman & Robert Creeley

  • Simon Pettet - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

    Simon Pettet - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

  • Lorenzo Thomas, Ray di Palma, Gary Lenhart, Diane di Prima, Lorna Smedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber

    Lorenzo Thomas, Ray di Palma, Gary Lenhart, Diane di Prima, Lorna Smedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber

  • Ed Sanders, Anne Waldman, Bob Rosenthal, Judith Malina, Hanon Reznikov & Ed Friedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber, ca 1997-98

    Ed Sanders, Anne Waldman, Bob Rosenthal, Judith Malina, Hanon Reznikov & Ed Friedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber, ca 1997-98

  • Cecilia Vicuña - Photo Credit: Laure Leber

    Cecilia Vicuña - Photo Credit: Laure Leber

  • Barrett Watten, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Barrett Watten, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Thomas Sayers Ellis, 1995 - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter

    Thomas Sayers Ellis, 1995 - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter

  • James Schulyer, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    James Schulyer, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Lee Ann Brown & Bernadette Mayer - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

    Lee Ann Brown & Bernadette Mayer - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

  • Nicanor Parra & Allen Ginsberg - Photo credit: Vivian Selbo, 1987

    Nicanor Parra & Allen Ginsberg - Photo credit: Vivian Selbo, 1987

  • Alan Davies, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Alan Davies, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Kenward Elmslie, Steven Taylor - Photo credit: Laure Leber

    Kenward Elmslie, Steven Taylor - Photo credit: Laure Leber

  • Kenneth Koch & Allen Ginsberg post-fire Parish Hall, 1979

    Kenneth Koch & Allen Ginsberg post-fire Parish Hall, 1979

  • Alice Notley, 1989

    Alice Notley, 1989

  • Jim Carroll - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

    Jim Carroll - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

Visit the Poetry Project Photo Archive

The Poetry Project has, over the decades, provided poets with a safe haven, laboratory, and stage. These, combined, have activated and preserved our various ways of thinking and linking language to ourselves and to the world. Remarkably, the Project has never stopped reinventing itself as an institution: that is, it has allowed the currents of poetic innovation to inform its choices and decisions. In this, it is as unique as it is irreplaceable.

—Ann Lauterbach

From the Project Blog

Introduction for Rodney Koeneke

I listened to a 2004 Segue reading where Rodney Koeneke read with Sharon Mesmer on PennSound to prepare for writing this introduction. I don’t think I have ever heard so much laughter from the audience at a reading. I then had a fantasy the laughter from Koeneke readings could provide laugh tracks for TV. Each poem could be the sounding of the person who is invited to object at a wedding right before the ceremony reaches its conclusion. Rodney is agile and friendly in his poems. The poems are calming, while at the same time being a disrupting voice at the volume of acute social criticism. This produces what he names in his poem “The Real Aeneid” a “winkingness,” at and with the system of happiness, while also performing an exegesis of the accumulations or simultaneities that don’t make sense. Instead of sense for Keonoke the import is an itch. (more…)

Introduction for Uroyoán Noel

I wonder how Uroyoán Noel collects so much excited, resistant, and varying language. His poems reveal a hyper awareness or as he calls it in his 2010 book a Hi-Density Politics. As if a walking spam filter, Noel takes the viral detritus of late capitalism, of insistent colonialism, of ruins from resorts to craft his poetry. He riffs on the booming voice of the car salesman on the radio with generous satire. Noel describes the poet as “the bookworm who sings like an owl atop this underarm unreason.” Oh, the underarms of cities or sites, solidified in that public bench that endangers you with its “c” encased in a circle of copy-written CEO beggars. (more…)

Introduction for Brenda Coultas

While at a flea market or on a city street, a thing might stick to your eye. Perhaps its memory makes you lonely. How do you “open” this interest, like the “old purse”? Coultas’ “tatters” in the raw accumulate like an aged clump of receipts inside a family’s home. The scope of all the histories one might carry around with them emerge while looking at the future of a melting glacier, a fracked piece of land. The sold sign is jabbed into the front lawn of the house of nature. What is unsolved, what elemental fires burn for a narrator on this earth, or as Brenda Coultas calls it, the “eyeball of the galaxy,” where a detail, never too ordinary or layered in someone’s else’s code of garbage, is ever too small. Coultas collates the tatters through concerns: “Who holds the crystal clear machine guns?” (more…)

Read more in the Project Blog →