• Nicanor Parra & Allen Ginsberg - Photo credit: Vivian Selbo, 1987

    Nicanor Parra & Allen Ginsberg - Photo credit: Vivian Selbo, 1987

  • John Ashbery & Kenneth Koch - Photo credit: Laure Leber

    John Ashbery & Kenneth Koch - Photo credit: Laure Leber

  • Lorenzo Thomas, Ray di Palma, Gary Lenhart, Diane di Prima, Lorna Smedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber

    Lorenzo Thomas, Ray di Palma, Gary Lenhart, Diane di Prima, Lorna Smedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber

  • Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1986

    Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1986

  • Charles Bernstein, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Charles Bernstein, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Kenneth Koch & Allen Ginsberg post-fire Parish Hall, 1979

    Kenneth Koch & Allen Ginsberg post-fire Parish Hall, 1979

  • Miguel Algarín - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

    Miguel Algarín - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

  • Thomas Sayers Ellis, 1995 - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter

    Thomas Sayers Ellis, 1995 - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter

  • Simon Pettet - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

    Simon Pettet - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1990

  • Jim Carroll - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

    Jim Carroll - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

  • Barrett Watten, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Barrett Watten, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Alan Davies, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Alan Davies, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • James Schulyer, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    James Schulyer, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Amiri Baraka

    Amiri Baraka

  • Ann Lauterbach, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

    Ann Lauterbach, Poetry for the Next Society Symposium - Photo credit: Laure Leber, 1990

  • Alice Notley, 1989

    Alice Notley, 1989

  • Pedro Pietri - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1991

    Pedro Pietri - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1991

  • Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman & Robert Creeley

    Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman & Robert Creeley

  • Kenward Elmslie, Steven Taylor - Photo credit: Laure Leber

    Kenward Elmslie, Steven Taylor - Photo credit: Laure Leber

  • Taylor Mead - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

    Taylor Mead - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

  • Tracie Morris & Vernon Reid - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

    Tracie Morris & Vernon Reid - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1998

  • John Giorno - Photo credit: Sarah Wells, 1981

    John Giorno - Photo credit: Sarah Wells, 1981

  • Lee Ann Brown & Bernadette Mayer - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

    Lee Ann Brown & Bernadette Mayer - Photo credit: Jacob Burckhardt, 1993

  • Yoshiko Chuma - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1995

    Yoshiko Chuma - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1995

  • Cecilia Vicuña - Photo Credit: Laure Leber

    Cecilia Vicuña - Photo Credit: Laure Leber

  • Brenda Coultas - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1996

    Brenda Coultas - Photo Credit: Melissa Zexter, 1996

  • Ed Sanders, Anne Waldman, Bob Rosenthal, Judith Malina, Hanon Reznikov & Ed Friedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber, ca 1997-98

    Ed Sanders, Anne Waldman, Bob Rosenthal, Judith Malina, Hanon Reznikov & Ed Friedman - Photo credit: Laure Leber, ca 1997-98

Visit the Poetry Project Photo Archive

The Poetry Project has, over the decades, provided poets with a safe haven, laboratory, and stage. These, combined, have activated and preserved our various ways of thinking and linking language to ourselves and to the world. Remarkably, the Project has never stopped reinventing itself as an institution: that is, it has allowed the currents of poetic innovation to inform its choices and decisions. In this, it is as unique as it is irreplaceable.

—Ann Lauterbach

From the Project Blog

“Yellow Fever” by Sally Wen Mao

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Sally Wen Mao - photoSally Wen Mao is the author of Mad Honey Symposium (Alice James Books, 2014), the winner of the 2012 Kinereth Gensler Award and a Publishers Weekly Top Ten Pick of Fall 2014. Her work has been anthologized in The Best American Poetry 2013 and is forthcoming or published in Black Warrior Review, Guernica, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, Mid-American Review,and Third Coast, among others. A Kundiman fellow, she holds a B.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from Cornell University, where she was a lecturer in creative writing and composition for three years. She currently lives in Brooklyn, NY and teaches in the Asian American Studies department at Hunter College.

 

 

 

 

“ASSANGE and DEAD YOUTH” by Joyelle McSweeney

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Joyelle McSweeney - photoJoyelle McSweeney is the author of eight books in multiple genres, most recently the verse play Dead Youth, or, the Leaks, a hacked carcinogenic farce which was selected to inaugurate the Leslie Scalapino Award for Innovative Women Playwrights, as well as The Necropastoral: Poetry, Media, Occults, which reads together authors as diverse as Jack Smith, Wilfred Owen, Aime Cesaire and Kim Hyesoon. With Johannes Goransson, Joyelle edits the international press Action Books and teaches at the University of Notre Dame.

 

 

 

 

 

from “Just Call Me Al” by Benjamin Hollander

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Read more at The Brooklyn Rail

Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 3.54.55 PMBenjamin Hollander was born in Haifa, Israel and as a boy immigrated to New York City. He presently lives on the west coast of North America. His books include: In the House Un-American (Clockroot Books/Interlink Publishing, Spring 2013); Memoir American (Punctum Books, Spring 2013); Vigilance (Beyond Baroque Books, 2005); Rituals of Truce and the Other Israeli (Parrhesia Press, 2004); The Book of Who Are Was (Sun & Moon Press, 1997); How to Read, Too (Leech Books, 1992); and, as editor, Translating Tradition: Paul Celan in France (ACTS, 1988).

Of his newest book, In The House Un-American, the poet David Shapiro says: “It is difficult to speak of Benjamin Hollander’s masterpiece, so America, so like an inner emigration, as if we had all changed names….A book of this order comes very rarely to our consciousness; we are so censorious of new genres….[T]his book exists as music barely heard in the air becomes music of our ground, grain.”

Read more in the Project Blog →